All posts by fast code Design

Launched in November 1995 by Alan Webber and Bill Taylor, two former Harvard Business Review editors, Fast Company magazine was founded on a single premise: A global revolution was changing business, and business was changing the world. Discarding the old rules of business, Fast Company set out to chronicle how changing companies create and compete, to highlight new business practices, and to showcase the teams and individuals who are inventing the future and reinventing business.

Ikea’s latest collection is an ode to the best parts of childhood

Look away, helicopter parents.

A giant monster hand. A loom. A 32-foot-long coloring book tapestry. A paint roller. You read that right, parents. A. Paint. Roller. This is the Ikea Lustigt collection, the company’s latest limited edition collection developed in conjunction with the design agency Vår–and not for you, but for your kids, ages 6 and up.

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These familiar sounds will soon disappear from our world

More museums are preserving old technology, but an online archive focuses on the sound it makes. Among the relics? Apple iBooks and Nintendo controllers.

We–writers, curators, designers, users–give huge amounts of attention to the look and feel of objects, articulated through industrial and interface design and preserved in museums, books, and other lasting media. Sound, on the other hand, seems too conspicuous to even get a shout-out.

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Brad Pitt’s housing nonprofit Make It Right faces lawsuit

Rotting structural issues and mold contamination are among the allegations surfacing from residents of New Orleans’ Lower 9th Ward, where Make It Right developed more than 100 houses after Hurricane Katrina.

In the wake of 2005’s Hurricane Katrina, actor and celebrity Brad Pitt rose as an unlikely savior in New Orleans. His nonprofit housing foundation, Make It Right, stepped in to help rehabilitate the badly devastated Lower Ninth Ward with the development of more than 100 modular and affordable homes. Billed as energy-efficient, LEED Platinum-certified structures designed by star architects including Frank Gehry, David Adjaye, and others—and bolstered by the support of fellow celebrities, from Oprah to Ellen Degeneres—the ambitious philanthropic undertaking was even awarded a 2016 National Design Award by the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, among the design industry’s highest honors.

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The way we build doesn’t take climate disaster seriously enough

Here’s what coastal planners, policy makers, and homeowners need to do to prepare before it’s too late, three researchers write.

Coastal communities around the world are struggling to adapt to rising sea levels and increasingly severe coastal storms. In the United States, local governments are making investments to reduce those risks, such as protecting shorelines with seawalls, “nourishing” eroded beaches by adding sand and rerouting or redesigning roads and bridges.

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Can architecture help heal Genoa after a devastating bridge collapse?

“Bridges, homes, and all constructions should be treated like living bodies.”

Genoa is Italian architect Renzo Piano’s hometown–and after a bridge in the Mediterranean port city collapsed August 14, killing 43, Piano described himself as “overwhelmed” for his “wounded city.”  According to The Guardian the architect, who won the Pritzker Prize in 1998 and has built structurally innovative buildings (and bridges) all over the world, is now pledging to help it rebuild with a new bridge.

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The iPhone’s original UI designer on Apple’s greatest flaws

Imran Chaudhri discusses how we can regain control over our devices–and how Apple can do better.

It’s been a decade since the British designer Imran Chaudhri first imagined a user interface that would introduce millions of people to the smartphone. Chaudhri joined Apple in 1995, soon rising to become the design director of the company’s human interfaces group–where he was one member of the six-person team that designed the iPhone.

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