All posts by Menswear Style

The Hottest New Summer Mens Haircuts

The Hottest New Summer Mens Haircuts

The best summer haircuts for men have the ability to look stylish, whilst keeping you cool in the heat. From buzz cuts to quiffs through to fades, the following looks from TONI&GUY’s International Artistic Director, Jamie Devenish, promise to keep your hair in check from mornings spent at the pool, to evenings at the bar.

The Hottest New Summer Mens Haircuts

Comb-over Pompadour 

Slicked-back hair is always popular in the summer regardless of length. Instead of slicking hair up and back like the original pompadour, the comb-over directs hair to the side. If you have shorter hair, this is a quick look to style and if your hair is longer, the use of the comb-over will keep hair away from your face – win win! A top tip in re-creating this look: Start with clean, towel-dried hair and comb through label.men Sculpting pomade before blow-drying to the side. The pomade will provide great hold and shine, plus your hair will win the battle against sun, sea and sand.



The Hottest New Summer Mens Haircuts

Textured Crop 

A classic blend of high fashion meets beach boy. Due to its natural ability of giving the look of thicker, more volumised hair, the textured crop is generally favoured by a more mature clientele. The style also works really well on almost all hair types, however it’s not the best for curls, as it will give the illusion of a rounder face shape. A top tip in re-creating this look: label.m Fashion Edition Powder to Wax will give volume and buildable texture, without going full ‘shaggy-surfer dude’. For optimum results, shake the powder into your palm and rub your hands together to create a creamy wax. Guide your fingers through the front to evenly distribute.



The Hottest New Summer Mens Haircuts

Buzz Cut 

When the sun is shining, a quick solution to keeping your scalp cool is to shave the hair off! Instead of buzzing it all off this year, opt for a more versatile variation. The ‘Sherbet’ is a classic clipper cut with faded sides and is slightly longer on top. There are many variations of the buzz cut, so speak to your barber about the one that best suits your face shape. Either way, the maintenance of this style promises to be easy – crucial when you’re out and about enjoying the sun. A top tip in recreating this look: If your head shape is slightly bumpy, avoid getting a style that’s too close to the head. We would recommend going for a grade 3 or 4 – which is just short enough to stay cool, but long enough to shield the scalp. We also advise using label.men Scalp Tonic as fading can be quite abrasive on the head and will soothe whilst invigorating the scalp.


Article by Menswear Style

Discover July 2018 Coolest Stuff

Discover July 2018 Coolest Stuff

It’s just so damn hot. Don’t get me wrong, I love a bit of sunshine but when its constantly 30 degrees every day, I soon start craving cooler weather so I can actually sleep at night. But let’s put my rather British weather complaints to one side, because there’s been some interesting wares and product drops this month that I’d like to draw your attention to. We have skincare perfect for tattoos, pocket squares that look like pieces of art and a 35th anniversary shoe collection. So, following on from my June round-up, I’ve compiled a list of my favourite products and releases for the month of July 2018 – enjoy.

Discover July 2018 Coolest Stuff

Suicoke X Clot 

The new Clot x Suicoke drop brings back the Alienegra Desert Camo graphic print in the Suicoke OLAS-CLTab model. The sandals appear in two colour ways featuring the iconic Alienegra Desert Camo print in an Olive as well as a Beige tone. The campaign has been situated in the natural environment of Hong Kong’s Pineapple Mountain, reminiscent of the views of the Grand Canyon. Inspired by the contrasts found in city life versus nature, the sandals are the perfect hybrid between style and functionality. With its adjustable nylon shoelaces and Vibram soles, this limited-edition collaboration reaches new heights through its innovative design.

Discover July 2018 Coolest Stuff

Rockport Winning In Style 

Rockport present their ‘Winning In Style’ lookbook, showcasing an array of the most highly anticipated styles from their forthcoming AW18 collection. Ranging from the brand’s iconic DresSport 35th anniversary edition through to the highly anticipated Total Motion chukka boot silhouette, Rockport’s latest offering is a true testament to the brand’s rich history and industry leading approach to innovation and style. To showcase the collection, Rockport tapped three UK based creatives in the form of Oliver Hooson, John Jarrett and Darren Rowlands, each of whom leant their unique take on street style to an array of the new season’s silhouettes.

Discover July 2018 Coolest Stuff

Salvatore Ferragamo Eyewear 

Salvatore Ferragamo Eyewear introduces the Men’s Capsule, a new eyewear collection that combines modern design and flawless elegance in a distinctive range of sunglasses and optical styles for men. The brand’s artisanal flair and rigorous attention to detail is revealed in the sleek reinterpretation of vintage inspired shapes and classical frames fashioned from smooth acetate and shiny metal. Each model is enhanced with exclusive contrasts and refined accents ranging from striped motifs and transparent effects to the iconic ‘Double Gancini’ detail featured as a unique emblem of style and sophistication.

Discover July 2018 Coolest Stuff

New Balance New 247 

New Balance has announce the release of the new 247. As a contemporary evolution, the updated silhouette gives a nod to their heritage while further representing the intersection between where lifestyle and sport meet. The new 247 design combines the craftsmanship, technology and fit that New Balance is legendary for and offers the versatility necessary for the modern style seeker and their on-the-go lifestyle. The sneaker offers a more substantial upper design versus that of the original 247 – perfect for on-the-go comfort and ease, while remaining stylish with chunky elements reminiscent of iconic styles.



Discover July 2018 Coolest Stuff

Electric Ink Skincare 

When your body is a canvas and tattoos are your artwork, it’s important to take care of them. With Electric Ink Skincare, tattoo and skincare couldn’t be easier – their specialist products are packed with ingredients that keep skin looking nourished and tattoos looking fresh and vibrant. All Electric Ink Skincare products contain a mixture of oils and vitamins that work to nourish the skin and protect the tattoo, as well as improving the definition of the tattoos and keep them from looking faded. Every product can be easily incorporated into an established skin care routine.

Discover July 2018 Coolest Stuff

Olivers Passage Pant 

More durable than denim and as comfortable as your favourite sweatpants, this is a performance trouser you can wear on a bike ride into the boardroom. The material is like no other you’ve felt before, yet to look at, it appears very familiar. They feature 4-way stretch which is durable, flexible, soft, light and suitable for all weather and all purposes. Olivers are also so sure of their hard-wearing construction that they’ll repair or replace any product with a fault outside of normal wear and tear for up to 12 months after purchase.

Article by Menswear Style

An Expert Guide to Mens Waistcoats

An Expert Guide to Mens Waistcoats

The World Cup dream may be over for England – but it’s generally agreed that making it to the semis is a stunning achievement for our team. And the chaps are not coming home just yet as there’s a 3rd place game against Belgium to look forward to. At the helm; Gareth Southgate. Cool, collected, committed, and stylish too, with his surprise choice of sharp tailoring making headlines and sparking yesterday’s #WaistcoatWednesday trend. So, what is it about the waistcoat that’s caused such a resurgence – and what’s the best way to get Southgate’s look? Our good friend Jake Allen, Founder of Bespoke Tailors King & Allen, has plenty of hot tips to share with you.

An Expert Guide to Mens Waistcoats

Yes, a waistcoat makes an obvious style statement (and flatters most physiques) – but it’s also more of a practical garment than you might have first thought. For one thing, it’s incredibly versatile: it keeps you warmer in the winter and, during the hottest summer action, you can remove your jacket and still stay looking eminently cool – as Gareth Southgate has beautifully demonstrated from the technical area, even during the semi-final’s most nail biting moments.

An Expert Guide to Mens Waistcoats

Go Simple with Single Breasted 

One of the most common off-the-peg styles, the single-breasted waistcoat is a great go-to that suits everyone’s body shape. If you’re looking to customise your look, consider adding more buttons (or indeed, taking some away) from the conventional five-button style. For most body shapes, we’d recommend a pointed finish to the hem, as it elongates the torso, which has a flattering effect. With its mix of smart style and total wearability, it’s not surprising that Southgate has gone for this style to support his most important career endeavours to date.



An Expert Guide to Mens Waistcoats

Go Traditional with Double Breasted 

This is a more traditional option – perhaps better for Autumn and Winter, since it’s difficult to unbutton without looking a little messy. But, for a particularly formal occasion, the double-breasted waistcoat makes for an elegant and timeless look. Since the bottom hemline tends to be straight, not pointed, make sure that you try before you buy, to avoid any messy ‘shirt overhang’.


 

Accessorise Black Tie with the Horseshoe 

The most striking style on offer, the horseshoe is the favoured option for very formal occasions. It lends itself really well to black tie, since it offers a modern alternative to the traditional cummerbund, which can feel cumbersome to wear. The deep opening also allows for showing off shirt studs, bibs and pleats, whilst covering the waistband of your trousers.



An Expert Guide to Mens Waistcoats

Lose the Jacket with a Lapel 

Any bespoke waistcoat can feature a lapel and it’s a great choice for very warm weather, since it formalises your waistcoat to such an extent that you could easily go jacketless and still look up to scratch. Lapels also offer lots of options to add your own style in a bespoke suit. You can experiment with colour, contrasting cloth and even add a signature stripe to make the look your own. The signature stripe is something you can get at King & Allen and involves having a few words or a phrase stitched into the cloth, much like a pinstripe. It’s picked up a lot of interest this week, thanks to a photoshopped meme of Southgate’s waistcoat saying: ‘IT’S COMING HOME’. Sadly, it’s not real, and sadly, we’re coming home without the World Cup trophy for real – but given England’s stunning performance during this season we think he’d have every right to get several full signature stripe suits made up to mark the achievement.



An Expert Guide to Mens Waistcoats

Cut Your Own Style with Cloth Backed 

The cloth back isn’t to be confused with the traditional lining back – historically, lining was used as a practical solution as the back of the waistcoat was never intended to be seen. But, in modern formalwear, the cloth lining is coming into its own. Matching a cloth lining to the rest of the waistcoat is a really smart look, potentially eliminating the need for a jacket in hot weather. Whilst, in cold weather, the cloth adds an extra layer of robustness to keep you warm. For a statement piece, you could even contrast the cloth – but be careful, there’s a difference between statement and just plain odd!

An Expert Guide to Mens Waistcoats

Other Sartorial Style Options 

England’s performance right up to the semis tips the team to go from strength-to-strength before our next big chance in 2022 and, if he keeps this up, Southgate’s bound to be back in the spotlight again. Here are three of our best insider tips we think he might love to wear for future big matches: 

Statement cloths: Tweeds, tartans, velvets, herringbone, brocade…the choice is endless, and don’t forget that your waistcoat doesn’t have to match your suit. Choosing a contrasting colour or pattern can enhance a suit no end. Would a union jack waistcoat be too much? One thing’s for sure, if anyone can carry it off, Gareth Southgate can. 

Pocket watches: Pocket watches are very much back in fashion, thanks to the Peaky Blinders style trend, and they can look debonair if carried off with confidence. Perhaps this might be the best way to check extra time on the pitch too.

Add a show button: The bottom button rule dictates that you should never do up the bottom button of your waistcoat or jacket. This is a convention driven by practicality – born out of the irritation of having to fasten and undo your button every time you stand or sit. However, it also creates room for the addition of a ‘show button’. It could be a personal tribute, carry an engraved message, feature a precious material, or even – might we venture – be styled as a football? Or maybe that’s just one step too far…

Article by Menswear Style

In Conversation with Louie Threlfall

In Conversation with Louie Threlfall

This summer sees a new flagship BBC One drama coming to our TV screens. Already being tipped as a hit series, the hype has started amongst critics as it is the next project from Debbie Horsfield: writer of the award-winning programme Poldark. Don’t expect post-revolutionary action and adventure with Aidan Turner riding around on horseback as this time Horsfield has written a more modern storyline; revolving around the lives of a dysfunctional family who own Mirrorbel Beauty Salon in the Northern Quarter in Manchester. Exploring the challenges of youth, age and long-term relationships, the six-part series comes with some very familiar British TV actors and actresses including Robson Green, Polly Walker and Lisa Riley. There are also some fresh faces on the scene and MenswearStyle had the opportunity to interview one of the stars, Louie Threlfall.

In Conversation with Louie Threlfall

Recently graduated from theatre school, Louie has taken on the role of Tyler: a true Mancunian, Tyler has found his own sense of style at the young age of 19 which leads him to follow his passion and study fashion in Leeds. As the storyline develops, Tyler’s strong relationship with his working family becomes increasingly evident and even has an impact on the outcome of his family’s future. Aside from their own business and personal struggles, Louie’s character has his own challenges to deal with, including discussing his sexuality. Speaking to the young actor, it is clear just how much Threlfall enjoyed filming this intriguing and humbling series. He has come fresh out of the blocks from studying acting at school and has already gained a respected amount of experience from appearing on the stage, in shows such as David Copperfield and Richard III. To go straight into a BBC series must be quite daunting, especially considering his fellow cast, however Louie appears to have taken it all in his stride and we look forward to seeing how he progresses and, of course, where the storyline leads.

In Conversation with Louie Threlfall

You are about to play 19 year old Tyler in a new BBC series, could you tell us more about your role in Age Before Beauty? 

“As the series begins, Tyler is on his way to study fashion in Leeds. He’s Manchester born and bred, and has spent a lot of his life helping his mother, Belle’s (Polly Walker) business at the Mirrorbel Beauty Salon in the Northern Quarter. Tyler is probably what you would call a Mum’s boy. When he’s back down in Manchester, he’s spending a lot of time helping out the family business. He shares a close bond with his twin sister Lexie (Lucy Polgar), they share everything together. His relationship to his aunties, in particular tattoo-artist Tina (Lisa Riley), goes through bigger journeys. Lexie and Tina are close enough to him that he can talk with them about his lifestyle and relationship advice with boys. It’s not something that he discusses often with his parents, even though they know he’s an openly gay man. Tyler comes more into his own as the story develops.” 

What has it been like working with such a well-known British TV cast?
 

“I’m going to out myself here: I didn’t have what you would call the best foreknowledge of the body of work which some of our cast had achieved. I felt a bit silly during our first meet in rehearsal when I asked Lisa if she had done a lot of soap television in the past. She was so polite about it though and we’ve laughed ever since. If we were having a tiring day, you could bet that someone would do or say something that would start a chain of hysterical laughter.”

In Conversation with Louie Threlfall

Has anyone in particular in the cast offered you any acting words of wisdom?
 

“Lisa gave me a lot of invaluable advice on how to live life in the business as happily as I could. I would be doing a scene opposite her, we’d walk away and she’d say ‘See? Not so bad was it?’ That meant a lot, because you can make a big deal of what you’re doing in your head but it’s better to relax and have fun. Struan is an absolutely amazing guy. It was easy to sit and chat to him between scenes. Sometimes if I felt confused about something in or out of a scene, he’d simplify it for me in a heartbeat. At some point, every one of them taught me a lesson. They were all great.”
 

Where does your love of acting come from?
 

“It’s as simple as when I was really young, I just liked performing. As I grew and evolved so did my love for acting, but it developed into an appreciation of telling stories and having them told to me – the way they made me feel and how I wanted to give that feeling to others. I once met an employee at a museum in Manchester, she told me how much she appreciated actors because they have ‘the power to change the way people think’. It reminds you of the importance of the arts. Cinema became a big influence on my interest in the craft. At some point, quite early on in my life, I just knew that I was driven to tell stories, anything from freeing people of concern to showing them a dark side of the human condition. It can be a really fulfilling job. I once heard someone describe this profession as ‘addictive’. They weren’t wrong.”

In Conversation with Louie Threlfall

Your character, Tyler, is really passionate about fashion, does that ring true in your day-to-day life outside of acting? 

“I wouldn’t say I have the same level of passion as Tyler does. But I do like how fashion works and the way that, much like with acting, it’s never finished. My friends will definitely attest to my comfy days (which are most), when I’d literally just walk out in a baggy shirt, sweat trousers and sandals; especially on hot days like we’ve had recently. Not to say I don’t pay attention. I know for certain that I got to wear clothes that I wouldn’t have touched in a million years in real life on this show. Not because it wasn’t stylish, on the contrary, it was on this show I learned that mustard yellow is my colour. I suppose I’m not necessarily one for skinny jeans or tight-fitting jackets that don’t reach my waist, not in my day-to-day life. But the clothes I wore for Tyler helped me very much in the process of discovering who he was. Garments are so important to transform, they just give you a physical sensation different from your own, which is invaluable help.”
 

The show has been predicted as a new hit series, do you agree? If so, why do you think that is? 

“I certainly hope it will be! I’ve seen the first episode with cast and crew and it looks fantastic. I give most of the credit to Debbie, she is the creator after all. She’s created such a brilliant world that we all recognise, even when it has occasional fun forays into the fantastical. There are a few surprises which I’m very excited to see what audiences think of. The visual style is just gorgeous – before anything even touched the screen in post-production, the colours popped like nothing else. It’s hard to sum up any project’s total worth, but it has pretty much everything you would ask for, from the fun moments to the dark ones. I feel like it’ll appeal to a lot of people, it’s a timely story.”

In Conversation with Louie Threlfall

Debbie Horsfield famously wrote Poldark, do you feel there is any pressure to stand up to her previous successes? 

“I don’t think anyone should feel any pressure in that sense. The show stands on its own as good television. Our wonderful and omniscient director, Paul Norton-Walker, has a brilliant understanding of Debbie’s writing and seemed to know precisely how to translate it to screen from the start. Artists and creatives tend to compare their current work to their past projects, as is only natural in the pursuit of perfection, but I think we all knew what we were doing and where we were going with it very early on.” 

You have played some interesting roles out on stage, do you have a preference for theatre or TV? 

“I have so much love for both, each for different reasons, all of which I won’t be able to list here. On stage, if you feel like one performance wasn’t very strong, you have the opportunity to try again the next time and keep working on it. It’s a long-term process working on the same play every night and keeping it fresh, playful and truthful. On screen, the camera doesn’t lie. If you show it anything inauthentic, there is a very high chance the viewers will see it. The fun, and sometimes tricky part of that is adjusting the work to be even more grounded, or at the very least to be not as dramatic. The techniques on how to navigate a scene differs on the stage too.”

In Conversation with Louie Threlfall

What would be your dream role to play? 

“I love to transform. I have even more fun the more I get to play around with a character that is really far away from what you’d maybe expect of me. I’ve been lucky enough to be able to throw myself into some demanding roles in the past. Those are the dream roles to me. Full disclosure though, I do dream of performing in historical theatres like in Stratford Upon-Avon and in London ones like The Old Vic. The stage is admittedly one of my favourite places to be. Oh yeah, I would also love to be an Avenger. Jack Sparrow needs a prequel. Does Kylo Ren need a son? Hit me up Disney.”

Article by Menswear Style

New York Mens Day SS19 Roundup

New York Mens Day SS19 Roundup

London has MAN, and New York Fashion Week: Men’s has New York Men’s Day (NYMD). The two give a platform to emerging designers to showcase their latest collections, and in NYC, NYMD kicks off the week-long event that eventually sees bigger names presenting their SS19 offerings. We received an invite and headed over to CreativeDrive on the edge of the city’s Financial District. If you’ve ever been in the area, it’s one of the many larger office buildings down the street from the Staten Island Ferry. The setting – a row of studios, each dedicated for half the day to one designer, down to the theme and inspiration – seemed equally as nondescript, save for the circus-themed booths you passed upon entering, until you started watching the presentations themselves. The morning saw six brands present, and the late afternoon shifted to five more. If the day could be summed up with one phrase, it’s this: Menswear has reached the point of fluidity that streetwear and suiting can coexist in the same literal space, without either half seeming like an oddity. It’s a far smoother dichotomy – almost boundary less, even – than what you see from similar women’s presentations and reflects where fashion is collectively progressing: To the point where there’s no true formality, leisure gets taken seriously and ironic statements, in losing their edge seem accessible. Here’s a rundown of each of the day’s presentations.

New York Mens Day SS19 Roundup

Sundae School 

A fairly new brand and another first-time presenter, Sundae School considers itself a smokewear label that delivers functional style for modern-day cannabis enthusiasts. Dae Lim, who did stints at VFILES and McKinsey & Company and studied applied mathematics at Harvard, puts both parts of his background to use here. If you’re of a certain age, or at least grew up in certain urban areas of the US, you know what weed-influenced fashion can be: graphic tees with cartoon characters toking it up, tacky platinum necklaces with cannabis leaf pendants, or cheap Rastafarian-inspired digs. Thankfully, you won’t find any of that here, and unless you spotted the ‘Smoking Chills’ tee or the fan painted with ‘Smoke Sessions, Not Jeff Sessions,’ you might not have gotten the reference. Lim’s mathematics background emerges through wider, more spacious silhouettes, cut with angles or asymmetrically. Some appear robe-like, and others as casual suiting tied across the front. And, aside from the occasional pop of blue, all of the shades and patterns subtly hint at marijuana use: light and dusty green shades that could look militaristic, if they weren’t the same colour as a joint; brown hues reminiscent of rolling papers; and a blue and white print similar to Dutch pottery, likely referencing Amsterdam coffeehouses. Yet, amidst all this, Sundae School makes one thing clear: Their clothing’s made for chilling out, no matter if you’re stoned or sober.

New York Mens Day SS19 Roundup

AGENT
 

Admiration for ‘dad fashion’ tied together the morning’s presentations, with AGENT taking a literal approach. Presenting at NYMD for the first time, the brand – founded by Terrence Williams, who previously worked at LA footwear brand Creative Recreation, and Joshua Fronda, from the UK and a former designer for Clarks, Puma, and Lacoste – captured that laidback, don’t-care effortlessness through an assortment of slouchy and cropped silhouettes: baggy, pleated trousers, joggers tapered above the ankle, stonewashed jeans, unstructured blazers, bombers cut above the waist and longer polos. At a glance, the accessible designs made almost everything ideal for everyday wear. Yet, that’s too simplistic of a synopsis. The expected and direct established clear-cut boundaries that allowed Williams and Fronda to play around with textures, silhouettes, and symbolism. For one, materials stretched from shiny nylon through knits and what appeared to be slightly rumpled cotton blends. As well, the presentation went for unisex territory, with a handful of female models sporting wider-cut, athletically styled garments. Then, while the stonewashed jeans and polos played up the ‘dad relaxing on the weekend’ angle, a handful of models with silver chains around their necks flipped the script and perspective: You can just as easily wear these as classic urban gear as you can modern-day, ironic streetwear. 

Descendant of Thieves
 

Sometimes, there’s no need for allusions. Descendant of Thieves, a NYC-based brand started by Matteo Maniatty and Dres Ladro in 2009, designed its collection around the party culture of Tulum and the Mayan Riviera. Bright colours and Hawaiian-style prints fleshed out the region’s leisurely atmosphere, illustrating why youth from the US and Europe flock there for spring holidays. Within this visual setting, they hinted at the Mexican location with Day of the Dead motifs and cut silhouettes that you’d actually wear, should you be heading down to spend time on the sand to listen to the chill sounds of a big-name DJ. With a literal beach scene serving as the presentation’s backdrop, rows of models rotated positions to highlight the collection’s styles. Nothing here read as serious or uptight, from the rolled chino shorts to the unstructured blazers, bombers, and button-up short-sleeve shirts. Instead, Descendant of Thieves made a very strong case for pattern clashing: It wasn’t unusual to see florals and stripes alongside a vibrant solid hue. And, vibrant they could be, from saturated yellows and pinks to solid gold. Yet, with menswear gravitating toward such seemingly unfamiliar territory, Maniatty and Ladro created one of the day’s more forward-thinking yet still practical lines.

New York Mens Day SS19 Roundup

Limitato 

Another first-time presenter, Limitato is one of those brands that seems simple on the surface – much of their SS19 presentation appeared to be photographic placement prints – but goes far deeper. Specifically, designers Gustave Peterson, Emrik Olousson, and Alex Ulvsgard go by the philosophy that art should transform culture, and thus, they strive to blend fashion with hospitality and current affairs. For the actual clothes, the team gathers images from artists and photographers and then converts them into “Limitato Wearable Art.” With these points in mind, classic rock music framed their SS19 collection, down to the drum set, amplifier, and electric guitar in the background and a table to the side featuring a book open to a photo of the Rolling Stones. Images of lips established a clear allusion to the seminal blues rock band, while a placement print of Marilyn Monroe more subtly emphasised that “live fast, die young” philosophy that’s characterised decades of rock music. Complementing the sweatshirts and tees, skinny velvet trousers with visible metallic ankle zippers could’ve easily been worn by Mick Jagger back in the ‘70s. 

David Hart
 

Since graduating with a BFA in fashion design in 2004 and starting his own label in 2009, David Hart has been named a CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund finalist and one of GQ’s Best New Menswear Designers in America, and was nominated for The International Woolmark Prize in Menswear. The designer, who spent time working under Anna Sui, Tommy Hilfiger, and Ralph Lauren, envisioned his line as historically influenced, nostalgically inclined apparel that’s still accessible for the modern gentleman, and with this Watergate-themed SS19 presentation, each of those influences came through. For the only suiting-focused morning presentation, Hart made his 1970s setting clearly evident. Wide-lapeled styles – some solid and others sporting a bold pattern – could’ve been worn at the office during the period – but wouldn’t have been out of place during that prom scene in Carrie, either. Although a desk, typewriter, and tape recorder hinted at the theme, garments straddled the line between clearly masculine and intentionally feminine, with seahorse brooches reminding the audience of the way gender roles can be flipped naturally. Specifically, suiting and colour-blocked polo shirts established that masculine foundation. Yet, even something clearly meant for the male form can still reflect the feminine: Here, that came through patterned neck scarves, pleated, flared trousers, large velvet ties mirroring a pussy-bow blouse, and glittering brooches.

New York Mens Day SS19 Roundup

Bristol Studio 

Recipients of Gen Art’s 2016 menswear designer of the year award, designers Luke Tadashi and Tommy Nowels seem to understand that athleisure’s turning into a well-worn, if not tired, path of lazy sweatshirt and jogger silhouettes. It’s gotten to the point that we’ve seen it all before, and the actual athletic elements seem to fade into the background, if not get pushed aside entirely. Thus, Bristol Studio’s SS19 collection almost reversed that familiar combination, hammering home actual athletic pieces and infusing, if not draping, them in higher-end style. Aspects like oversized basketball shorts, drawstring sweatpants, a track jacket, dad trainers, pulled-up white socks, and a pullover with Adidas and Bristol Studio logos, most in neutral hues, looked more appropriate for an evening training session. But, Tadashi and Nowels juxtaposed that with unusual pops of colour – dusty pink and yellow-orange – and the occasional strictly fashion piece, such as a see-through jacket or pleated trousers. As such, rather than treat activewear like a tossed-off trend of the day, Bristol Studio knows that such pieces operate on two levels: Purely practical and clothing that’s meant to be relaxed in. 

This is Sweden 

Ana and Pablo Londono created This is Sweden in 2013 as both a political statement and future-envisioning collection, oftentimes with both concepts overlapping each other. Influenced by how, as children, they discovered how one’s appearance could play a role in an observer’s attraction or loathing, and further by how the Swedish flag, at one point, symbolised the country’s right-wing racist attitudes. The result blends Swedish culture and symbols, including those familiar colours, with tech materials and high-quality construction. Out of all the afternoon’s presentations, This is Sweden appeared the most minimal: Four models stood on individual platforms, while additional photos of the collection covered the walls. A quick look made the line seem denim oriented: Matching jeans and cropped jackets in bright yellow and traditional deconstructed materials. Yet, nearby, camouflage patterns created a contrast amongst the fluidity of these average streetwear silhouettes: The universality of denim, versus the militaristic, if not right-wing symbolic, print. The surrounding photos – perhaps, if you were being dismissive, as a way to use fewer models – essentially brought the extremes together. The models photographed sported similar rayon bomber jackets, but if you studied the pictures for even a moment, you would’ve noticed they weren’t the usual cadre of youthful faces. Rather, a much larger demographic – young and old, male and female, and encompassing multiple ethnicities and religions – indicating that casual fashion is what unites us all.

New York Mens Day SS19 Roundup

HBNS 

Known for its denim, HBNS is the brainchild of self-taught designer Akio Mitobe, who launched the brand back in 2006. While made in Japan, HBNS reflects Mitobe’s love for Americana and vintage styles, with emphasis placed more on work, military, and surf influences. For its first NYMD presentation, HBNS set the stage with elements of a construction site: models leaned against wood beams, metal pipe framed the top and sides, and a couple of step ladders made it seem like renovations were about to start. Thus, within this more literal setting, Mitobe tread into familiar workwear territory: Slim, structured denim speckled with splatter paint, pleated trousers reminiscent of something Dickies might produce, and faded ripped materials hinting at the wear resulting from everyday use on the job. But, knowing where its strengths lie as a denim brand, HBNS didn’t replace the familiar woven material with cotton duck. Instead, a series of two-piece ensembles expanded upon what might have been dismissed as a Canadian tuxedo with bright prints and colours: Hawaiian patterns, tye-die reminiscent of a Firecracker ice pop, and soft dandelion yellow. After all, if a cotton or linen-blend short suit’s a viable option for dressing up in summer, why can’t you do the same with denim? 

Vanessa Zhang 

Capturing the NYMD’s concept on a microcosmic level, Vanessa Zhang, a self-described “fashion incubator,” showcased collections during the afternoon program from three emerging designers: Kevin Ng, of Unawares, known for a minimalist aesthetic; Jiahao Wan, a recent graduate of the Parsons School of Design, who put together a collection inspired by artificial intelligence and Y2K culture; and Han Xi, a 2017 graduate of the University of the Arts London, who put together a collection inspired by light, curve, and colour. Zhang’s efforts, with this presentation and beyond, offer the designers resources to grow their businesses globally. Likely as a result of this approach, the presentation lacked the cohesion present in others. Boxy silhouettes, long coats, high-waist trousers, geometric colour-blocking, and overlapping tiered materials formed the foundation for many pieces on stage. Yet, from here, we were introduced to what seemed like a rain motif: transparent PU materials juxtaposed with a linear print reminiscent of falling precipitation. As well, workwear hints came through, with double flap chest pockets added to blazers. And, as one smaller element, that oversized office garb look sported by a few post-Soviet fashion brands also made an appearance. Amidst all this, models held circular-shaped handbags that, with a long top strap, resembled canteens.

New York Mens Day SS19 Roundup

Krammer & Stoudt
 

From Hollywood to Venice Beach, California might as well be Americana in concentrated form. While based on the East Coast and manufacturing their garments in New York, Krammer & Stoudt, under the direction of Michael Rubin, looks toward classic SoCal subcultures and the mysterious desolation of the Southwest. Krammer & Stoudt’s SS19 collection reflected this split. Playing throughout parts of the presentation, Foster the People’s ‘Pumped Up Kicks’ established the West Coast admiration, while a couple of models displayed some Bone Breaking moves – a dance style originally from Brooklyn. Style wise, draped silhouettes in neutral hues seemed reminiscent of NYC’s Public School, and at the same time, aspects like camp collar shirts and souvenir jackets pulled directly from mid-century Hollywood. In between, short suit sets, cropped trousers, bucket and wide-brimmed hats captured year-round warm-weather style from a more sophisticated angle – something that’s only truly possible when you’re hanging around Los Angeles.

Article by Menswear Style

What Makes a Good Boardshort

What Makes a Good Boardshort

You’ve got choices for swimwear. Or, more specifically, you’ve got three major categories to choose from: traditional swim trunks (which often look like something your dad wears), ultra-tiny Speedos (only truly practical if you swim professionally) and the boardshort (a surfer style that’s a practical choice for the average guy). This guide won’t focus on the benefits and drawbacks of these three. Rather, as more and more opt for the slimmer, stretchier boardshort, we’re going to cover every basic factor you’ve got to consider. Developed initially for board sports, from surfing through paddleboarding, boardshorts run minimal but not skimpy. The design uses less material – that way, they won’t catch onto something – yet typically has enough protection to prevent any irritation from board wax.



What Makes a Good Boardshort

What results is typically a polyester or nylon blend with some elastane included for that extra degree of stretch. Unlike trunks, most don’t have that light, shiny look. Instead, the material seems a little more structured, looks like brushed twill and has a softer hand-feel, but let’s your body move a bit more naturally. As well, styles generally feature a combination of a drawstring closure, a Velcro fly, mesh lining, pockets and drainage ports. The physical features are just part of the picture, though. Men’s swimwear has trended more toward land-to-water styles, and your boardshorts, as such, not only need to look like actual chino shorts, but should also shed water quickly once you’re back on the shore and headed toward the bar. As such, brands rarely skimp on quick-dry, water-repellent treatments. Otherwise, you’ve got to contend with bunched up, wet garments for the next hour. Within this framework, you’ve got a range of fits, patterns, and constructions. Some are better for the surfers out there and others designed for the guy spending more time on the shore.

What Makes a Good Boardshort

The Right Fit 

However you spend your summer months, nothing kills your energy like boardshorts that don’t fit. Too baggy, and you’ll feel like you’re wearing soaked-through cargos. Too tight, and that ride-up and wedgie becomes inevitable. Instead, think of your boardshorts as an investment piece: It’s one style you’ll use over and over, during the course of a few years. First, look for a silhouette that mirrors your chino shorts: Slightly tapered, always above the knee, and with just enough room to move. A pair shouldn’t hug your thighs, but it shouldn’t hang from your waist like a skirt, either. Along with these points, think about the waist. Velcro with a drawstring is traditional, and ideal for those with straight, if not sculpted, torsos. For a bit more literal wiggle room, opt instead for the elastic waistband.

What Makes a Good Boardshort

Technical Uses 

At its core, the boardshort is a technical garment, one offering surfers a closer, flexible fit and water-repellent properties without the full-body clinginess of a wetsuit. Through this context, a purely technical boardshort needs length: above the knee or even covering. Yet, the design should never be too billowy to catch onto or get tangled with something (control is absolutely key). Added to this, you can’t not think about stretch materials. The standard is two-way stretch – enough to move if you’re casually surfing or paddle boarding. More advanced designs from Billabong and O’Neill, on the other hand, opt for four-way stretch, or flexibility that extends in all directions. If you’ve got more active pursuits in mind for summer, this second option is the way to go.

What Makes a Good Boardshort

Land-to-Water and Back 

Most of us won’t be surfing out – although a bold-coloured, striped, or floral-based print often gives off that impression. Rather, your seaside – or even poolside – jaunts take you multiple places, and who wants to keep on changing? In response, the land-to-water short – sometimes called ‘amphibian,’ ‘amphibious,’ or ‘submersible’ – has seen its presence grow over the past few years. What differentiates this style from traditional boardshorts? For one, it’s a true hybrid. The exterior looks casual and unassuming – think chinos or even cargos – but water-resistant properties, stretch construction, and thinner microfiber materials make it feel and perform like a pair of boardshorts. As such, no one can quite tell you’re walking around basically in swim trunks, you’ve got something for taking a dip in the ocean, and whenever you’re ready to find a spot for a slice or drink, you won’t be walking around dripping wet from the waist down.

What Makes a Good Boardshort

Quality 

Back to that bit about boardshorts being an investment piece. If you’re truly looking for quality construction, as opposed to a once-and-done-for-the-summer piece, you’ve got to look for a handful of attributes. One; look at the mesh lining inside. If it’s as flimsy as a pair of high school gym shorts, it’ll rip and fray after a few wears. Two; check the drainage ports. For higher-quality options go for metal, as opposed to a stitched hole. Third; Velcro’s a contentious feature. Some avoid it at all costs, opting for a pull-on design with a drawstring. Others, however, consider it essential if the shorts don’t have an elastic waistband. All in all, consider trying on a few styles to find what fits well.

What Makes a Good Boardshort

Length
 

How long – or short – should you go? As a guideline, many boardshorts’ outseams vary from 19 to 22 inch long. Unsure about where that will fall on you? Just measure from above the hips – roughly two to three inches – and down. If it’s covering or falling below your knee, the style’s too long. Yet, last year, menswear designers became enamoured with the shorter short, and in response, this length now influences swimwear styles. Some say the shorter length ultimately makes your legs look longer. As a general guideline, the shorter boardshort should extend no more than two to four inches above your knee cap. Inseam wise, taller men should think about a 6 or 7 inch inseam; if you’re on the shorter side, 4 or 5 inch might be more proportional. But, in speaking about proportions, your waist plays another factor. Having a wider waist and shorter inseam looks off-kilter – not to mention, you’re approaching Speedo territory. Instead, the rule here is, the wider your waist, the longer your inseam should be.

Article by Menswear Style

How to Navigate the Races Through the High Street

How to Navigate the Races Through the High Street

The first rule I would adhere to when dressing for the races is, if there’s barriers in front of the horses, the meet will likely be a Winter/Early Spring occasion and so the likes of Tweed and thicker materials such as wool are appropriate. If however, the horses aren’t impeded by obstacles, it’s likely a summer event and you want to go for lighter fabrics such as lightweight wool, linen or seersucker; styled with brighter tones and neutral colours (Unless it’s Ascot – then it’s a case of dusting off the morning suit). If you are attending the Chester races this weekend and want to get your hands on the Mr Green Ladies & Gents Evening ‘Best Dressed’ award, then you’re going to need to nail your outfit and the finer details, so you’re not pipped at the post.

How to Navigate the Races Through the High Street

The Jacket

When it comes to the races, many blokes seem to immediately think a suit is their best bet. Although suits can look fantastic, why not be a little imaginative and create a winning jacket and trouser combination that screams sartorial style and knowledge. Given that it’s summer and we’re currently in the middle of a heatwave, I’d very much advise you to go for a linen jacket, as they’re both lightweight and in season. Add an extra element of style to your outfit by choosing a double-breasted number (an option that the majority of men would shy away from), which can take your ensemble to new levels. As for your bottom half, you want to stick to standard block colours and ensure that the trousers are well tailored to your leg length. How about tapering the leg to add another element of style, so they sit just above your shoe to reveal some ‘mankle’. This look may not be for everyone, but I challenge you to venture out of your comfort zone and take a contemporary approach to the races.



How to Navigate the Races Through the High Street

The Shoes 

You can never go wrong with an Oxford shoe at a race meet, especially if the ground is good to hard, as there will be plenty of resistance to ensure you don’t sink your heels into the ground. Another option for this time of year is the loafer, especially if you’re backing the mankle approach to your trousers. A suede loafer is my preferred choice during the summer months but please remember to spray with suede protector, and perhaps stick to the less muddy areas of the spectator area.



How to Navigate the Races Through the High Street

The Tie

A tie is often an unattractive option when the temperatures are soaring into the high twenties, however, I’d always suggest backing one for the races (and you’ll likely be required to don one if you’re situated in hospitality). It’s a simple way of adding colour and personality to your look (avoid cartoon characters please).



How to Navigate the Races Through the High Street

The Pocket Square

Not compulsory but I’d highly advise you go with one. Just like with the tie, the pocket square is a sartorial staple and can add vibrancy to your race day look, especially if you nail the colour pairings rule.



How to Navigate the Races Through the High Street

The Sunglasses

Can you really attend a summer event without sunglasses within this day and age? So long as you’ve chosen the right style for your face shape, they’re a great way of spicing up your outfit and if the sun does disappear behind the clouds, then tuck them in your top pocket to further accessorise your outfit.



How to Navigate the Races Through the High Street

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Article by Menswear Style

5 Must-Haves For Newbie Cyclists

5 Must-Haves For Newbie Cyclists

Cycling is the new golf, and for millions of people across the UK it’s an exciting adventure they are embarking on for the first time. Government research indicates that the number of miles British cyclists travelled every year between 2006 and 2016 was up 26%. More people are buying bicycles, taking them to work, and cycling for leisure than ever before. If you’re part of this new wave of cyclists, here are the five essentials you’ll need to make your ride safer and more enjoyable.



5 Must-Haves For Newbie Cyclists

1. Clothing 

Stylish cycling clothing is probably the most crucial element of this sport – especially in the UK, where you can expect poor weather for most of the year. Investing in the right gear will keep you warm and dry regardless of what nature throws at you. Start with the basics and build a cycling wardrobe that doesn’t break the bank. You’ll need a base layer, bib-shorts, hand and knee warmers, a short-sleeved jersey, and a gilet. Gloves during winter and a lightweight rain jacket are also essential depending on the season. Try to pick the lightest attire so that it’s easy to carry and pack away when you reach your destination and change.

5 Must-Haves For Newbie Cyclists

2. Tools 

Bicycles are simple and most of the repair work can be done in a few minutes. But you don’t want to be stranded in the middle of nowhere with no network coverage to call out for help when your tyres are punctured or the chain breaks apart. Of course, you can’t carry all your tools, but you can prepare for the most common disruption – punctured tyres – with a small inner tube and lightweight pump. If you’re willing to carry a mobile toolkit around with your bike, make sure it has Allen keys, a spare chain link, gear cable, and Torx bit. 

3. Helmet 

Cycling accidents on British roads are unfortunately common. Although you can’t prevent injuries entirely, you can reduce the chances and severity of head trauma by diligently wearing a helmet everytime you ride. For now, all helmets sold in the UK meet European Union standards so even a basic helmet will protect you. Expensive helmets may offer better ventilation or light-weight materials.

5 Must-Haves For Newbie Cyclists

4. Water Bottle + Cage 

The humble water bottle and cage combination is perhaps the least expensive and most essential cycling gear. Cycling without it will quickly lead to dehydration, so make sure this is the first thing you buy. 

5. Cycling Shoes 

Clipless pedals or cycling shoes are shoes with cleats that drastically improve your cycling experience. They bind with the pedals and allow you to pedal more efficiently, with pressure on the downstroke and leverage on the upstroke. It’s difficult to explain, but you will intuitively know how to use them to your advantage the first time you put them on. “As natural as breathing,” is how most professional cyclists would describe the experience. Once you try them, you’ll never want to cycle with regular shoes again.

Article by Menswear Style

How to Correctly Style Yellow Menswear

How to Correctly Style Yellow Menswear

Possibly the most avoided colour in men’s fashion is Yellow. Notoriously unforgiving; wear it right and you’ll look great, but wear it wrong and you’ll look like a giant lemon. Similar to other bright colours, yellow should be worn sparingly e.g. no big flamboyant pieces along with no fluorescent shades (you’re not a lollipop man). We recommend keeping yellow out of the work place and reserved purely for casual comfortable outfits.



How to Correctly Style Yellow Menswear

Stick to three shades 

Pale yellow, butter yellow and a mustard yellow (see here for neon yellow). Pale yellow should be accompanied by pale colours such as lighter blue denim shades such as light greys and beige. This nulls the power of the yellow for a more worn out vintage look. For a golden butter yellow, pair it with contrasting bland colours such as black and navy, this allows the yellow to be the statement of the outfit while the other items limit the pop. Mustard yellow is a safe bet for starting out because it fits great with navy and black because they anchor the boldness of the colour. Mustard yellow works best for coats, jumpers and other bigger outerwear items. It should be noted that if wearing white with yellow, use it sparingly and in small details of the outfit only.

How to Correctly Style Yellow Menswear

Find the shade that best fits your skin tone 

Pale guys need to be thoughtful when wearing yellow. Go too light and you’ll be washed out. Even fairer hair colours can be at risk of being fully drowned out by simple accessories. Stick to darker shades of yellow and ensure you contrast them properly with navy and black when styling the rest of the outfit. Comparatively, darker skin types needn’t worry as already contrasting backgrounds and colours compliment any shade of yellow best.

How to Correctly Style Yellow Menswear

Use it in detail 

Yellow is underutilised in breaking up outfits. It’s an intense colour to use with darker outfits as it gives an extra flair in prints on jumpers, stripes on T-shirts or details on shoes (It’s very versatile). Moreover, when paired with the other primary colours of red and blue it denotes a very retro vibe. It should be noted that these colours should be used in patterns on a solid base background to reduce the risk of looking like a clown.

How to Correctly Style Yellow Menswear

The menswear items that should be yellow 

The easiest way to introduce yellow into your wardrobe is in small steps. Start off with casual T-shirts and accessories to learn how to best pair with certain colours such as greys and navy. Slowly transition into introducing bigger and bolder items such as jumpers and sweaters which will round off outfits whilst keeping it practical and simple. These items allow for everyday wear but maintain the ability to be covered up with darker outerwear if needs be; giving slight hints of yellow details to an outfit. Only then would we endorse spending the extra money on mustard coats and shoes for real statement, bold pieces.

How to Correctly Style Yellow Menswear

Have fun with it 

Yellow is a happy colour, so you should be happy wearing it. It’ll take time to develop pulling off yellow with confidence but once mastered, you’ll have significantly superior style knowledge compared to your counterparts. Don’t be afraid to try mix-and-match with a variety of dark shades in order to find your set style and once again, confidence is key with bright colours (yellow is no different). 

Article by Menswear Style

Are Cargo Trousers Trending Again

Are Cargo Trousers Trending Again

Initially made for and worn by the British Armed Forces in the 1930s, cargo trousers had somewhat a bumpy ride throughout the years, going through some bad press in the 1980s, until making a successful come back at the end of the last century. And indeed, men’s cargo trousers have become increasingly popular again over the last few seasons. Fortunately, though, long gone are those oversized cargos from the early noughties.

Are Cargo Trousers Trending Again

Granted, not the best choice if you’re going for a formal outfit. Cargo trousers, sometimes referred to as combat trousers or combats, are the ultimate piece of clothing for a more relaxed look. Celebrities, from Ryan Reynolds to Shia LaBeouf, rock this casual appearance. Furthermore, numerous designer brands intending on reviving the military style are bringing cargo trousers back to their collections. They are messing around with fit and form, utilising traditional colours like olive, black and navy; but also, and rather unsurprisingly, introducing various camouflages. Indeed, combats play a big part in the military-inspired streetwear renaissance.

Are Cargo Trousers Trending Again

Across men’s fashion, casual wear especially, we can find bulkier, baggy combat trousers. Those with a somewhat slimmer outline and smaller pockets, and cargos with a regular straight leg. You can choose from cargo trousers with tapered legs or even smart-looking slim ones. But if you are a traditionalist, you’ll probably stick to the somewhat bulkier cargos. Whatever you decide, since most of them suit any body shape, you’ll find one for you. Cargo trousers were designed for function, and multiple leg pockets of various size and positioning are what makes them unique. Big enough to fit all outdoor essentials when hiking, and traditionally used to hold field dressings and other equipment, these are quite handy during the peacetime too e.g. in the urban jungle and for less outdoor savvy types. There are examples with – literally – pockets within pockets, but most designs keep it simple, sometimes solely as a decoration.

Are Cargo Trousers Trending Again

Sagging under the weight of their own material and sitting near the knees, large pockets are the closest to the original cargo trousers design. Most models come with expandable, pleated pockets but in many examples, the pockets are flat. Those tailored pockets, usually located closer to the hips, are neater, and it is a solution very popular with modern hiking trousers. These pockets stay flat until the very moment you need them. Other than that, they remain almost invisible. Moreover, as cargo pockets tend to make your legs look bulkier, for many street fashion enthusiasts these trousers work best when pockets are left empty to complement the body shape. Naturally, practical and hard-wearing cargo trousers are great to use in the big outdoors. Those loose-fitting trousers are designed to be extremely durable and suitable for all outdoor activities. All those pockets can be handy while hiking and drawstring legs make them compatible with hiking boots too.

Are Cargo Trousers Trending Again

They’re an excellent choice for the summer season and work great when combined with a plain T-shirt, lightweight shirt, jumper and sneakers. In colder weather when sporting cargo trousers pair them with an oversized sweatshirt, navy overcoat or flight jacket and heavy military boots. We can see then that although based on a traditional military uniform, cargo trousers have long moved past being solely a piece of standard-issue clothing. And regardless of their practical applications, they became a mainstream fashion item for multiple occasions.

Article by Menswear Style