All posts by fast code Design

Launched in November 1995 by Alan Webber and Bill Taylor, two former Harvard Business Review editors, Fast Company magazine was founded on a single premise: A global revolution was changing business, and business was changing the world. Discarding the old rules of business, Fast Company set out to chronicle how changing companies create and compete, to highlight new business practices, and to showcase the teams and individuals who are inventing the future and reinventing business.

Why top restaurants are getting rid of stoves (and why you might, too)

These burners hang on your wall until you need to cook something, echoing a growing trend among professional kitchens.

I once had the chance to peek my head into the kitchen at Alinea, the avant-garde Chicago restaurant that’s also one of the top-ranked in the world. It looked nothing like I expected. The standard elements of commercial kitchens, with their industrial griddles, stoves, and salamander broilers, were almost completely absent. Instead, it was just a long room filled with unadorned stainless steel tables. If a chef needed to sauté something, they simply grabbed an induction burner–a magnetic-based hotplate that generates no ambient heat–and brought it to their spot.

Read Full Story

See China’s groundbreaking $4.8B “horizontal skyscraper”

The project, designed by Moshe Safdie, is the biggest and one of the tallest sky bridges in the world.

China is nearing completion of a new architectural landmark. The building is actually four distinct skyscrapers rising above the city of Chongqing. But what makes the project truly impressive is a 1,000 foot steel and glass sky bridge that connects them all, filled with trees, lagoons, observation decks, shops, and restaurants. Its developers call it “The Crystal.”

Read Full Story

The real reason Amazon, Apple, and Google are some of the world’s biggest companies

These companies use functional, if decidedly unglamorous, types of AI. The future of AI will be more of the same–not far-flung fantasies, like humanoid robots and machine consciousness.

Artificial intelligence researchers and engineers have spent a lot of effort trying to build machines that look like humans and operate largely independently. Those tempting dreams have distracted many of them from where the real progress is already happening: in systems that enhance–rather than replace–human capabilities. To accelerate the shift to new ways of thinking, AI designers and developers could take some lessons from the missteps of past researchers.

Read Full Story

Why every restaurant has an illegible menu

We all fall hook, line, and sinker for handwritten menus. That’s in part because McDonald’s wouldn’t dare try to give us one.

It’s easy to love that little cafe in your city–you know the one. The tables are too cramped. The prices are too high. The scallops are too done. And the handwritten menus are downright illegible in the soft glow of candlelight. But it has so much soul! You can feel the love!

Read Full Story

The Fyre Festival’s terrible pitch deck is now lorem ipsum

This hilarious design tool turns the spectacular con into boilerplate text for your next pitch deck.

The Fyre Festival was a disaster by any measure. It brought hundreds of young influencer hopefuls to a party in the Bahamian island of Great Exuma, who were then trapped without shelter, food, or water–a scam that would earn cofounder Billy McFarland a six-year jail sentence. But it was also a cultural spectacle that spawned not one, but two documentaries. And now, you can immortalize your next project with a piece of Fyre Festival history.

Read Full Story

The Fyre Festival’s terrible pitch deck is now lorem ipsum

This hilarious design tool turns the spectacular con into boilerplate text for your next pitch deck.

The Fyre Festival was a disaster by any measure. It brought hundreds of young influencer hopefuls to a party in the Bahamian island of Great Exuma, who were then trapped without shelter, food, or water–a scam that would earn cofounder Billy McFarland a six-year jail sentence. But it was also a cultural spectacle that spawned not one, but two documentaries. And now, you can immortalize your next project with a piece of Fyre Festival history.

Read Full Story

Tiny houses have a dark secret

It takes more than changing the size of a home to change the mentality of the people who live inside.

Tiny houses are everywhere. They’ve received heavy coverage in the media, and there are millions of followers on dozens of pages on social media. While there is no census for these homes, they have seen a surge in popularity in the decade since the Great Recession–witness the prolific growth of tiny house manufacturers, for instance. Originating in the U.S., tiny homes have also been popping up across Canada, Australia, and the U.K.

Read Full Story